Openness: what I enjoyed most in Google


(Just got back from Hong Kong, and extremely jetlagged. Why am I up at 4 in the morning…)

As I step back onto the school grounds in a blazing 90`F LA weather, I couldn’t help but to think back that awesome summer I’ve had. The 10-week internship at Google flew by like a blink. I’ve made some great friends, met some amazing people in the company, and walked away learning a lot of new things I wouldn’t even have heard about otherwise.

It’s also time now to think about internships again. Lately, I’ve been picking up on reading in blogposts, articles, and journals about work experience at different companies. I seem to have found a trend in all these posts: innovation. This word appears everywhere. Don’t get me wrong – it’s an amazing vision and mission to have, one that I often share and enjoy working for; but when everybody has it on their profile pages, what makes them different?

In a lot of ways Google’s innovations exceed far beyond what others can even imagine: grand technologies like Google Glass and self-driving cars, and tiny details like empowering blind users through improving accessibility in their apps. But these weren’t what made me fall in love with working there; no, what did was the openness in its culture and empowerment of their employees – it’s an innovation in the workplace.

How so? Take this for an example. As a mere intern, I had access to almost the entire codebase of Google from every single project. Compare that to what I heard from my host, who has worked in Microsoft as a PM intern without any code access – not even those in his own project, this is pretty darn cool. With access to a codebase this big, there is no lack of resources for learning how to use certain technologies. I cannot think of a better way of encouraging Googlers to go outside their safety zones and learn from others.

Every Friday, employees and interns enjoy a very special treat from Sergey and Larry themselves in a company-wide all-hands meeting called TGIF. They’d present about a product Google has been working on, and then take questions from the audience – any question. When I was interning, there were questions ranging from “How is Larry doing?” (with regards to his illness) to “Why did we buy Meebo?” And with that, you can surely expect somebody from the exec team is going to give you a detailed and thorough answer, as if presenting the entire exec meeting to you. What’s more awesome is that the mic is even open for interns, and a lot of us have surely taken advantage of this opportunity. This has created an environment of trust, one that ensures employees of the most honest feedback from management and room for creativity.

This is extremely hard for any business to pull off. The amount of effort it requires the leadership team to be this open is extraordinary. But the effort isn’t unnoticed, as it has built an extremely unique and impressive culture all around the company. Undoubtedly, this, is what I enjoyed most in my time at Google.

(Disclaimer: I’m only speaking about what I’ve seen and heard during my internship, and in no way do I represent any of the companies mentioned here.)